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20121216
20121216
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
authoritarian countries and around the world may be as helpful for me to mention those. i did time in russia, china, egypt, venezuela and even a few more. but i'm looking out of the book and what i set out to do is look at the struggle between democrats and dictators. which you find this is a wonderful political science literature out there on the topic. but in fact, it's actually lived by people in the very concrete way on a day-to-day basis. just a couple hours before he came over here this morning, many people are profiled in russia were just arrested. this is a fluid stream of income late and i wanted to look at how these two sides are facing off against each other. one of the things i don't think we often realize is the battle between democracies and dictatorships going on today as opposed to the not so distant past is actually almost always die struggle between individuals. and so why did i choose the countries i chose? i chose them because these are some of the most sophisticated regimes. what you find as it's actually, i think you could guess this from 20 above and if you are in anyw
and months. lou: moving quickly to syria as we wrap up. russia today -- from the deputy foreign minister, basically saying that they have acknowledged that bashar al-assad has been losing power and that his departure is a foregone conclusion. suddenly they are talking about stng support for bashar al-assad and making it very clear that they firmly support his regime. >> the russians cannot let go. he is an allied to iran and some are anti-american. what i see now is that the civil war in syria is going to grow, unfortunntely. an opposition that cannot bring him down very fast. lou: as always, thank you for being with us. thank you. lou:much more on the obama administration's foreign-policy in the middle middle east. the "a-team" towards us coming up. federal workers are thriving in the obama economy with record paid benefits. far outpacing government workers. it seems that government workers still unhappy. unions upset with the new reality of coworker reform. alan wilson joins us and tells us why they should be cheering you right to work lou: michele obama saying that voter suppression w
the soviet union. i asked my teenage daughter, she says you know, what's wrong with russia? russia was the soviet union and she said what's that? it's a big thing in the late 80s and early '90s before it toppled. we were geared up to fight them and most of us have never really considered iraq or knew who saddam hussein was. after that war was over, which winning was a forgone conclusion, you you no? the terrorism thing caught us by surprise. we thought they were rabble-rousers and never gave them too much credit. interesting enough all the buildings in khobar were told by the bin laden construction company and they had the bin laden stamps on all of the buildings. how is that for irony? but after that things kind of changed and the world trade center bombings and september 11 of course, we all know what happened that day. i was actually flying that morning and had come back from the middle east from another
and stuffed animals outside the american embassy. the prime minister formally sent condolences and said russia's thoughts are with the victims' loved ones. >> in rio de janeiro set a memorial. >> british prime minister offered condolences to the parents, saying, quote: it's heartbreaking to think of those who had their children robbed of them at such a young age when they had so much life ahead of them. people gathered in golden gate park to reflect on the tragedy. some people lit candles. others wrote notes to the victims' families while others simply cried. our coverage covers throughout the newscast. coming up at 10:30 we'll have a live report from newtown, connecticut. >>> we have developing news tonight in san francisco where a standoff is now underway with a man and possibly a hostage. that has led to the evacuation of a residential building where the man is hold up. jade hernandez is live at california and larkin with late details. jade? >> ken, police say a man who's threatening he has a weapon is refusing to come outside his apartment. traffic is being diverted from california to lark
not there. so evil. nthis happened in southerp russia. and this happened in norway in the island a year ago, and now happened here and we have had school shootings before, but never hitting a 6 year old child 11 times with a rifle. nlook at how columbine scarred us and changed the way schools are guard run and those with teenagers and god help us it was horrible. now take it down to first graders. i ran up town to see my daughter. picture the little children in the little outfits and their lunches and what are they thinking about. there a are thinking about play dates and legos and dolls and christmas. >> they are thinking about christmas and stanta clause and he was going to be here in 10 days. >> imagine, what will christmas be in newtown, connecticut will it always be this memory? it is difficult to report in a sober, somber way because it is it so emotion. it is difficult not to be impressioned and obviously over come with groveand sorrow. >> we'll see you tonight. >> hang tough. >> you, too. n10 o'clock. >> yes. see you then. >> much more tonight from newtown, connecticut. 10 o'clock e
into a global conflict lasting seven years, involve england, franch, austria, russia, prussia, and dozen other nations fighting for control over colonies in north america, africa, asia, and the seas in between. the seven years war changed the map of the world shifting national borders in europe, in africa, in india, and elsewhere. it leveled thousands of towns and villages in europe. killed or maimed more than a million soldiers and civilians, and bankrupted a dozen nations including england and france. remember, it started in britain's north american colonies, and the british government and british people naturally thought british subjects in british north america should share the costs of the war with their fellow citizens in britain. in fact, the government raised property taxes so high in britain that farmers rioted in protest and demanded that americans pay their fair share of the war. in 17 # 64, the british government extended to the colonies a stamp tax that everyone in britain had been paying for more than 70 years. it amounted to next to nothing for the average citizen, a pepny or tw
. managing relations with russia and china will be certainly at the top of the list. and of course, the most important issue of all, how to keep america safe, which is the organizing principle of any nation's foreign policy. if you can't protect your homeland, frankly, you don't need a foreign policy. that's at the top of the list. the intersection between politic, national security. this is going to be an incredibly challenging job at a critical moment, both in the nation's foreign policy and its national security. >> jamie: aaron david miller, who has advised six secretaries of states. please, we are asking you, as we see who is elected for this position and the national security team, come back, weigh in, let us know how they are doing on that. >> love to, jamie. take care. >> jamie: all the best. >> eric: jamie, we are awaiting a news conference on the latest on the school shooting in connecticut. that's what is going to happen. it's newtown and the podium being set up, as the cameras and the reporters and the news media are getting ready for the law enforcement official who is will give
, the ottoman empires, spain, russia, britain, each flourished for around 250 years, and this seems to be the space allotted for imperial he generalny. too long a period of power leads to decadence, so the empire goes from the pioneers to the innovators, to the bureaucrats, from exploration on exploitation to decadence, the quest for world approval, the welfare state and squabbles over inherited wealth. and a notable feature, he writes, of the declining nations is the loss of physical energy. he suggests, as does the bible, that the state of a human organism is no different than the family. both recapitulate human individual tendencies, and like the individual human, evolve in predictable directions. the human might, indeed can, live to be 120 years, but no longer, and will decay through predict blg stages as will the family, however well ty -- and the state, however powerful. and now we see we in america are at the outword end of sir john gloves' 250 years, and we see the signs. we have passed through the ages of outburst, conquest, commerce, affluence, intellect, and we've come to
were there. australia, russia, italy, france. england, germany. all over the world. following this story. all the major networks were there. you know, cnn was there, of course. and so this is an international event. and so the churches have a particular role when something like this happens. that is to help people make some kind of sense of it. when it first happened, everyone, including me was in a state of complete shock. i heard, i'm the same as anyone else, a sense of sickening sense of how could this possibly happen. and you try to wrap your mind around it. and comprehend that you can't, it's just impossible. even the ways that we typically try to understand events like this through psychology and they say the man was disturbed and things like that. he certainly was. but in a war, you can understand the cultural and political tensions like this, for a natural disaster this goes way beyond that. even a very sick mentally ill individual, could never just because of that, commit a crime so horrendous. so you're thrown back, on religious concepts, that's the only way to under
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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